Gaining Traction on high bank Fat Track curves

Big_Poppy Wednesday, 3/27/2019

My question is simple, is there a substance that can be added to the Fat Track high bank curves to keep some traction for your car without inhibating it's performance? Some might ask WHY? The chaos its what makes the Fat Track fun. 

I would like to have race with regular diecast on the Fat Track where a car would at least hold a line or not lose all traction while racing?

Big Poppy


Discussion

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Rusty 3/27/19

That is a great question.Wish I had an answer for you...The sizzlers had rubber tires which made them track well..Interested in what answers that may be out there...May try some of the real tire Hot Wheels?They are slower,But they may be the ticket for what you are looking for?

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Big_Poppy 3/28/19

I'm thinking one of these. Just one quick sweeping motion, just enough to put some particals on the track to give the cars something to grip. I'm leaning toward the Loctite Rubberized Undercoating. What does ANYONE think?

I just have to work up the guts to actually do it on the track itself. LOL 

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Cutty 3/28/19

I can understand your thoughts, it will be interesting to see some test results.

Cheers

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PeteB 3/28/19

Naturally you should do a test on some scrap wood/plastic first and see what sort of finish it gives.

Personally (and this is pure conjecture) I can't help thinking the resulting surface might be too coarse to run the cars over smoothly.
It would be interesting to see what test results you get though.

I had one of those 2 lane baby tracks when I was young. Me and my grandpa used it a lot. When I got older obviously the racing was no longer exciting so even though I was to old for the track we were tooning it to our liking for when ever we used it. It became fun again. One idea we had was really cheap bc we also wanted more grip. We were stupid (and we still are... lol) and decide to put some rubber that waa laying on the street, get it soo wet that it was basically just sticky water poured it on to the track and let it sit for a while when it was done the surface picked up just enough of the rubber particles that it had made a plasticy rubber. The cars maintained speed and the racing became more fun bc there wasnt a dominant car or lane. After quite a few years of racing we have grown out.of it but was fun. U may have to repeat this process many times as results may very. Remember use very warm water. Hope this helped.

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Big_Poppy 3/28/19

Whow! We may be on to something. I did use a slick plastic pallet to test on PeteB, (hehe), with this age thing I have gotten a little wiser. I made photos today and a movie. I was trying to get an Intro up first on my "Big Poppy Racing" Youtube Channel before any others videos. Needless to say I was very impressed with one of the products and will probably test it on one curve within the next few weeks. See ya'll on the Youtube!

Big Poppy  

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ConceptTA 3/29/19

Though I can't say for certain it would work in this application, but the company I work for makes a product to keep bowling pins from sliding around too much on a bowling lane pin deck. It's called Pin Deck Treatment and it is a liquid rosin mixture to make a surface tacky. The upside versus the rubberized coatings is that it can be cleaned off and you can put down varying amounts of the stuff. One application lasts a week or two in a bowling center. The company is Next Gen Bowling.

  • Thanks ConceptTA! That's a good idea. — Big_Poppy
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Big_Poppy 3/30/19

Well I bought a 8GB thumb Drive home with pictures and movies of the test results.... I can't find the darn thing. Errrrr. I'll get the pics MOnday and get them up.

BP

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PeteB 3/30/19

Looking forward to it. :-)

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